Spahr Studios
 
I purchased my first handpan on December 1, 2006. Ever since then, I have been enjoying the journey that began that day, and find that people of all ages and backgrounds are drawn to its distinct look and tranquil sounds. Listeners have described the sound of handpans as mesmerizing, ancient, spiritual and tranquil. Click here to listen to samples of my CD's.

I regularly give presentations for community groups, where I play my handpan and give a brief history of this enchanting instrument. I play mostly my original compositions, along with secular, and sacred music as well. I also play at festivals, churches and various venues throughout PA, Maryland, and New Jersey. Click here for my schedule.

Contact Me for performance information and availability.

If you need more information, posters, or artwork about me, click here for my Online Press Kit.

Want More Information About  Handpans?


For a basic overview, do a search on the web for “HANDPAN” or check out this entry on Wikipedia. You will find lots of videos on YouTube if you search for handpan.


There is a forum at http://www.handpan.org/forum/ which has more information about different handpans and makers than you can imagine ~ Enjoy your research!


There is a web magazine, http://www.hangdrumsandhandpans.com which has lots of good articles, and there are also many groups on Facebook with discussions on handpans. This video demonstrates the main brands of current handpans as of 2012.


Unfortunately, obtaining a handpan is not easy!  The Milltone drum is a related instrument which is much easier to buy and can be found on eBay. The HAPI Drum is also an easily bought alternative. Freenotes are really nice, too!


The PVC Flute

Did you get to hear Janet play her PVC Flute and would like to build one for yourself? The instructions on how to build a PVC flute can be found at this link:


http://www.flutopedia.com/roura.htm


Remember to use the white PVC plumbers pipe to build your flute. The gray electrical PVC pipe should not be put against your mouth. A cork from a bottle of wine can be used in place of the wood dowel as long as it fits tightly inside the pipe. A little glue could also be applied to the cork to keep it in place.